Nervous about the new arrival?

We offer in home training to help you with potty training and continue their basic commands. We will continue the socialization and ear wrapping, and introduce more advanced commands, more agility and teach house manners. The puppies also get to play with the other dogs when they are not working. We will also transition your puppy on to the food you will be feeding at home so he will have one less change to deal when it is time to go.

We also offer training services for all breeds and ages from house training to competition, please visit our training website for more information-

mindyourmanners.bravehost.com

Early Neurological Stimulation


We use the Bio Sensor/Super Dog Program which is early neurological stimulation exercises

done from days three to sixteen of the puppies life.

 
The U.S. Military in their canine program developed a method that still serves as a guide to what works. In an effort to improve the performance of dogs used for military purposes, a program called "Bio Sensor" was developed. Later, it became known to the public as the "Super Dog" Program. Based on years of research, the military learned that early neurological stimulation exercises could have important and lasting effects. Their studies confirmed that there are specific time periods early in life when neurological stimulation has optimum results. The first period involves a window of time that begins at the third day of life and lasts until the sixteenth day. It is believed that this interval of time is a period of rapid neurological growth and development, and therefore is of great importance to the individual.


 The "Bio Sensor" program was also concerned with early neurological stimulation in order to give the dog a superior advantage. Its development utilized six exercises, which were designed to stimulate the neurological system. Each workout involved handling puppies once each day. The workouts required handling them one at a time while performing a series of five exercises. Listed in no order of preference the handler starts with one pup and stimulates it using each of the five exercises. The handler completes the series from beginning to end before starting with the next pup. The handling of each pup once per day involves the following exercises:

 

1.       Tactile stimulation - holding the pup in one hand, the handler gently stimulates (tickles) the pup between the toes on any one foot using a Q-tip. It is not necessary to see that the puppy is feeling the tickle. Time of stimulation 3 - 5 seconds.


2.     Head held erect - using both hands, the pup is held perpendicular to the ground, (straight up), so that its head is directly above its tail. This is an upwards position. Time of stimulation 3 - 5 seconds

3.      Head pointed down - holding the pup firmly with both hands the head is reversed and is pointed downward so that it is pointing towards the ground. Time of stimulation 3 - 5 seconds

4.     Supine position - hold the pup so that its back is resting in the palm of both hands with its muzzle facing the ceiling. The pup while on its back is allowed to sleep or struggle. Time of stimulation 3-5 seconds.


5.     Thermal stimulation - use a damp towel that has been cooled in a refrigerator for at least five minutes. Place the pup on the towel, feet down. Do not restrain it from moving. If it crawls off of the towel, there is no need to place it back. Time of stimulation 3-5 seconds.

 

Five benefits have been observed in canines that were exposed to the Bio Sensor stimulation exercises. The benefits noted were:

  • Improved cardio-vascular performance (heart rate)
  • Stronger heart beats
  • Stronger adrenal glands
  • More tolerance to stress and
  • Greater resistance to disease.

In tests of learning, stimulated pups were found to be more active and were more exploratory than their non- stimulated litter mates over which they were dominant in competitive situations.
Secondary effects were also noted regarding test performance. In simple problem solving tests using detours in a maze, the non-stimulated pups became extremely aroused, whined a great deal, and made many errors. Their stimulated litter mates were less disturbed or upset by test conditions and when comparisons were made, the stimulated litter mates were more calm in the test environment, made fewer errors and gave only an occasional sign of distress when stressed.

 

 

The Rule of 7's

We strictly adhere to and strongly believe in these principles

By the time a puppy is seven weeks old he/she should have:
 

  • Been on at least 7 different types of surfaces:  examples-carpet, concrete, wood, vinyl, grass, dirt, gravel, wood chips
  • Played with at least 7 different types of objects: examples- big balls, small balls, soft fabric toys, fuzzy toys, squeaky toys, paper or cardboard items, metal items, sticks or hose pieces
  • Been in at least 7 different locations: examples- front yard, back yard, basement, kitchen, car, garage, laundry room, bathroom
  • Met and played with at least 7 new people: examples- include children and older adults, someone walking with a cane or stick, someone in a wheelchair or walker
  • Been exposed to at least 7 challenges: examples climb on a box, climb off a box, go  through a tunnel, climb steps, go down steps, climb over obstacles, play  hide and seek, in and out of a doorway with a step up or down, run around  a fence
  • Eaten from at least 7 different containers;  examples- metal, plastic, cardboard, paper,  china, pie plate, frying pan
  • Eaten in at least 7 different locations: examples- crate, yard, kitchen, basement, laundry  room, living room, bathroom




When they are able to venture outdoors for longer periods, they will spend time socializing with different types and sizes of dogs and they are also able to play on our "baby" agility obstacles which increases confidence and coordination.These obstacles include a wood and rock pile, a wooden plank suspended on milk crates, large and small balls and tunnels. Puppies that have a future of protection or working will also be encouraged to engage in tug-of-war with numerous items and chase rags and balls to engage their drive and increase their focus and bond with people. We encourage lots of visitors to pet and play with our puppies following our health protocols to ensure the health of the babies while increasing their acceptance of new people.

Mini Agility and Confidence building


From 4 weeks old our puppies are allowed and encouraged to play outside on the rock piles, over logs, climbing, running and having fun.
We have a mini-plank, tunnels, chutes and lots of different size balls and toys to increase their curiosity and confidence.
They also get to meet dogs, cats, goats, chickens and horses!

Puppy Adventure Box!!!


We want our puppies to go out and conquer the world!

The 7 Stages of Puppy Development
 

In order to understand why your puppy doesn’t listen to you at times, you need to understand each stage of development a puppy goes through as it matures.

Let’s take a look at the different stages, but before we do, keep in mind that these stages are generalizations – each dog will progress at its own pace.

Stage 1: The Transitional Stage 2-3 Weeks

The Transitional stage generally lasts from age two to three weeks, and it’s during this time that your puppy’s eyes will open, and he’ll slowly start to respond to light and movement and sounds around him. He’ll become a little more mobile during this period, trying to get his feet underneath him and crawling around in the box (or wherever home is.) He’ll start to recognize mom and his littermates, and any objects you might place in the box.

Stage 2: The Almost Ready To Meet The World Stage 3-4 Weeks

The Almost ready to meet the world stage lasts from 3 to about 4 weeks, and your puppy undergoes rapid sensory development during this time. Fully alert to his environment, he’ll begin to recognize you and other family members. It’s best to avoid loud noises or sudden changes during this period – negative events can have a serious impact on his personality and development right now. Puppies learn how to be a dog during this time, so it’s essential that they stay with mom and litter mates.

Stage 3: The Overlap Stage 4-7 Weeks

From 4-7 weeks your puppy begins the most critical social development period of his life – he learns social interaction with his litter mates, learns how to play and learns bite inhibition.

He’ll also learn discipline at this point – Mom will begin weaning the pups around this time, and will start teaching them basic manners, including accepting her as the leader of the pack. You can begin to introduce food to the pups starting around the 4th week – transition gradually as Mom weans them.
Continue handling the pups daily, but don’t separate them from either Mom or litter mates for more than about 10 minutes per day. Puppies that are removed from the nest too early frequently are nervous, more prone to barking and biting and have a more difficult time with socialization and training. Puppies need to be left with Mom and siblings until at least 7 weeks of age - and preferably a little longer - for optimum social development.

Experts say that the best time in a puppy’s life to learn social skills is between 3 and 16 weeks of age – that’s the window of opportunity you have to make sure your puppy grows up to be a well-adjusted dog. It’s extremely important to leave your puppy with Mom and his litter mates during as much of this period as possible. Don’t discipline for play fighting, housebreaking mistakes or mouthing – that’s all normal behavior for a puppy at this stage.

Stage 4: The “I’m Afraid of Everything” Stage 8 Weeks to 3 Months

The “I’m Afraid of Everything” Stage lasts from about 8 weeks to 3 months, and is characterized by rapid learning as well as a “fearful period” that usually pops up at around 8 to 10 weeks. Not all dogs experience this, but most do, and they’ll appear terrified over things that they took in stride before. This is not a good time to engage in harsh discipline (not that you ever should anyway!), loud voices or traumatic events.

At this time your puppy’s bladder and bowels are starting to come under much better control, and he’s capable of sleeping through the night. (At last, you can get some rest!) You can begin teaching simple commands like: come, sit, stay, down, etc. Leash training can begin. It’s important not to isolate your puppy from human contact at this time, as he’ll continue to learn behaviors and manners that will affect him in later years.

Stage 5: The Juvenile Stage 3 Months to 4 Months

The Juvenile stage typically lasts from 3 to 4 months of age, and it’s during this time your puppy is most like a toddler. He’ll be a little more independent - he might start ignoring the commands he’s only recently learned – just like a child does when they’re trying to exert their new-found independence. As in “I don’t have to listen to you!” Firm and gentle reinforcement of commands and training is what’s required here.He might start biting you – play biting or even a real attempt to challenge your authority. A sharp “No!” or “No bite!” command, followed by several minutes of ignoring him, should take care of this problem.


Stage 6: The Brat Stage 4-6 Months

The Brat Stage starts at about 4 months and runs until about 6 months, and it’s during this time your puppy will demonstrate even more independence and willfulness. You may see a decline in his urge to please you – expect to see more “testing the limits” type of behaviors. He’ll be going through a teething cycle during this time, and will also be looking for things to chew on to relieve the pain and pressure. Frozen doggie bones can help sooth him during this period.
This is also the second "fear period", be sure to expose your puppy to lots of new "friendly" encounters.
Bring lots of treats and praise your puppy for being brave and wanting to investigate.
He may try to assert his new “dominance” over other family members, especially children. Continue his training in obedience and basic commands, but make sure to never let him off his leash during this time unless you’re in a confined area. Many times pups at this age will ignore commands to return or come to their owners, which can be a dangerous, even fatal, breakdown in your dog’s response to you. If you turn him loose in a public place, and he bolts, the chances of injury or even death can result – so don’t take the chance.
He’ll now begin to go through the hormonal changes brought about by his growing sexual maturity, and you may see signs of rebelliousness. (Think adolescent teen-age boy!)

Stage 7: The Young Adult Stage 6-18 Months

The Young Adulthood stage lasts from 6 months to about 18 months, and is usually a great time in your dog’s life - he’s young, he’s exuberant, he’s full of beans – and yet he’s learning all the things he needs to become a full-fledged adult dog.

Be realistic in your expectations of your dog at this time – just because he’s approaching his full growth and may look like an adult, he’s not as seasoned and experienced as you might expect. Gradually increase the scope of activities for your dog, as well as the training. You can start more advanced training during this period, such as herding or agility training, if that’s something both of you are interested in. Otherwise, extend his activities to include more people and other animals – allow him to interact with non-threatening or non-aggressive dogs.